2 October 2012

Moon Over Soho - Reading Recommendation

Another installment of The Rivers of London series, we follow London Bobby Constable Grant as he gets futher into his education, and tackles cases - or rather ends up stumbling upon them. He is called to the city morgue, where a body contains an imprint of a jazz song - something isn't right.

(Book One here)

I really couldn't wait for this continuation of the series, and it didn't disappoint. Peter Grant is fleshing out to be an interesting character, well rounded with faults and opinions but really interesting - I especially like the idea that he is interested in architecture beginning a degree but not finishing it, and it really struck a chord. He's a good idea of a policeman too with a dark sense of humour that you suspect doctors etc. develop in order to cope with the brutal situations they find themselves in.

With more character hashing out, we find out more about Nightingale and how he ticks, but poor Leslie is relegated to recovering from the high-jinks of the earlier book in her family home.

The plot & sub-plot clashed a bit, making it a wee bit of a rough ride and there were a few introductions of old plots that were a little messy, but overall I really enjoyed it, ordering the new book immediately.


Great commuter read (though with the title "Whispers Under Ground" I suspect the next one is going to be even more awesome) and a definately if you're into Police/Urban Fantasy. I loved the book cover too, great idea. One of the 'squeal' moments for me, was when Peter Grant goes into the Wong Kei, a notorious Chinese Restaurant in London´s China Town...

(Please note any links to Amazon are through my Amazon Associates account, which means I make a little money (less than 5%) from any purchases made after clicking through these links. This helps support my book addiction, so if you are interested in buying the book, please click through the top link)

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