21 February 2013

The Xenophobes Guide to the English: Book Review

"Heat waves bring out the beast in the English. Cold and drizzle calm them down"


This was an amusing read about the stereotypes of English characters - it probably would have been quite good to read earlier in my travelling, but a page-turner nonetheless. It covers the importance of the cuppa (Tea), Cricket, stoicism (a much admired trait), how house-proud they are (especially oop north), how much they enjoy queueing, mentions their obsession with poo, and their sense of humour.

Lucky for us Nuu Zulunders, "The English have a special relationship...with the Kiwis who have model manners, but have an annoying tendancy to thrash them at rugby"

It does discuss the English preference to not make a fuss, or a "to do, a hullabaloo, a palaver, a kerfuffle, a song and dance". This is very much the bastion of the English character; for instance I've been in a restaurant several time with my hubby, and they have gotten his order wrong and he has said nothing, just looked po-faced, even when I've offered to mention the problem to the staff.

"Supplication, gratitude and, most important of all, apology are central to English social discourse."

So is getting your round in at the pub. It's a real social faux pas not to.

This is a good chuckle-read, to assist deciphering your pommy workmates and educate yourself a little on commuting. Written by English authors, it's very tongue in cheek, but quite apt. It's quite a good series, I particularly enjoyed the guide to New Zealanders, it even taught me a little something.

(Please note any links to Amazon are through my Amazon Associates account, which means I make a little money (less than 5%) from any purchases made after clicking through these links and it adds nothing to the price of your book. This helps support my book addiction, so if you are interested in buying the book, please click through the top link)

No comments :

Post a Comment

So, what do you think? Comments are blogging mana; short, sweet, long, loquacious, deep and meaningful...