7 August 2014

Waltham Windmill, preserving the bread basket of Lincolnshire

£1.50. There isn't much you can buy with £1.50 these days. A loaf of bread, a few pints of milk, or a bottle of coke in a ridiculously overpriced corner shop, but I think the best £1.50 I've spent in many years was at Waltham Windmill, dominating the local skyline of a local village 5 miles from Grimsby, a large town in the North-Eastern shires of England.

Waltham-Windmill,-preserving-the-bread-basket-of-Lincolnshire

On a fresh summer morning full of sunshine, verve and beautifully home cooked breakfast we found ourselves with a couple of hours to fill, whilst on a family visit to Mr Kiwi's hometown.

Waltham-Windmill,-preserving-the-bread-basket-of-Lincolnshire
Instead of rushing straight around to generally disturb the late-sleepers, we decided a wander was in order to clear our lungs of London pollution. Whilst rambling the pavements, we stumbled upon a building that was rather unexpected in the idyllic tranquillity. A working windmill that we could explore. How could we say no?
Waltham-Windmill,-preserving-the-bread-basket-of-Lincolnshire
The first mill on this site was built in 1666, sadly blowing down twice before the current building was erected in 1878. Now a local icon, the windmill is open all sorts of times during the year, run by passionate volunteers.
Waltham-Windmill,-preserving-the-bread-basket-of-Lincolnshire
Waltham Windmill is a six-sailed windmill located in the village of Waltham, five miles from Grimsby in North East Lincolnshire, England. It is renowned in the area for having all six sails still in full working capacity, being one of the very few windmills like this in the United Kingdom.

Waltham-Windmill,-preserving-the-bread-basket-of-Lincolnshire


Once you conquer the tight steep staircases (nb: don't do it in an ankle length skirt) the view from the top is gorgeous farm pastures, heaving with late summer crops.  


Waltham-Windmill,-preserving-the-bread-basket-of-Lincolnshire

Coming back down we stopped to admire the beautifully kept internal mechanics, informative boards and whitewashed interiors.

Waltham-Windmill,-preserving-the-bread-basket-of-Lincolnshire

Waltham-Windmill,-preserving-the-bread-basket-of-Lincolnshire

Once at the bottom again, a bag of ground flour and jar of preservation society strawberry preserve leapt into my bag. I was powerless to resist the siren call of the home-ground produce, and support a grass-roots charity in the most delicious way possible.


Waltham-Windmill,-preserving-the-bread-basket-of-Lincolnshire

How could anyone say no?

Waltham-Windmill,-preserving-the-bread-basket-of-Lincolnshire

This is what happens when you 'tiki-tour' around England on a staycation...

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16 comments :

  1. How fun, I would of had to buy the flour as well.

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  2. This is so cool! I'm gonna track it down.

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  3. That is awesome! It is amazing they let people look around considering it is a working mill. I like windmills.

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  4. Very cool! I'll have to convince Sam to make a slight detour next time we go north to his hometown. x

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  5. Oh windmills are beautiful, I love them nearly as much as I love lighthouses. It's brilliant to see it's a working windmill too! I remember always the windmill right by the Humber Bridge in Hull, it's not working but with the bridge behind, it's stunning!

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  6. Fun! I love the farm fields. A nice change of scenery from the thousands of bobbings heads I see everyday in the tube station..

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  7. You can't buy much for $1.50 these days either! When I was reading this post, It came to mind that the original windmill was built the same year as the great fire of London, in 1666, unless I have my dates mixed up of course, I'm just going on memory and haven't looked it up in awhile, but it's cool thinking about what was going on in history at the same time in different places.
    I have to say I have never been in a windmill! I'll have to find one and check it out, however I did find it amusing that in one of the pictures there were advertisements for Facebook and Twitter, they never would have imagined such a thing back in 1878!!
    I hope you have a really good weekend,
    Tammy x

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  8. I knew the second we walked in that I would be leaving with a bag full of baking plans :D

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  9. It's worth a wander through if you happen to be oop that way! They also have an AWESOME sweet store. The best in Lincolnshire allegedly.

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  10. It's really sweet! And the most epic sweet store is right next door!

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  11. It's so battery-recharging to be able to stretch your London muscles - getting away is my secret to loving London. Is that a bad thing?

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  12. I've never been able to get close enough to either to really appreciate what magnificent buildings they are. My next stop will definitely be the one by the Humber bridge!

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  13. Do you know what, I think you're spot on with that date!
    I know, I almost died when I realised it had a Twitter!

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  14. What an awesome discovery! Love the summery fields and skies. Looks like the perfect break from London :)

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