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    Barcelona, Spain #travelthursdays

    We started with a walking tour of his most famous works and our tour guide asked
    us: Gaudi – Genius or Madman? (Warning, you may want to make a cup of tea and get a
    biscuit, this is quite a photo heavy post, sorry!)

    Antoni Gaudi
    (1852-1926) was a Spanish Catalan architect and figurehead of Catalan Modernism.
    His architecture reflected his passions of architecture, nature and religion.
    (
    Wikipedia)

    He created/modified some of the most amazing
    buildings, using nature as a basis for everything he designed. The Sagrada
    Familia was his masterpiece, and is still not finished nearly 100 years after
    his death, even though he spent the last 12 years of his life exclusively
    working on it.

    The Passion Façade of the Sagrada Familia

    The Nativity Façade

    Up the on the
    bridge between the Nativity Facade towers:

    Sorry that was so
    Photo heavy – the buildings were just out of this world. I think he was both a
    genius and a madman – you have to be both to be great I think.

    Top tips:

    • Pickpockets are disgustingly rife. Be wary of anyone who speaks English to you or gets too close especially on the tube. Make sure everything is zipped securely.
    • La Sagrada Família: we took 5 hours to wander around. It’s really funny, we meant to spend a couple of hours max (including the tower tour) but it just sucked us in.
    • Best tip we were given? Book your Sagrada Familia entry tickets online in advance – the entry queues are phenomenal otherwise, and book your tower tour when you enter the site.
    • Definitely catch the cog train/furnicular to Montserrat. It’s gorgeous.
    • Try Pinchos. You pay by how many sticks there are on your table

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    Barcelona, Spain – the must-see Tourist Attractions

    I just had to share with you the other places we saw that were amazing. This will be my last post about Barcelona, I promise.

    Sagrada Familia: No question, this place is incredible.

    Park Gaule: Fantastic place to wander, watch the parrots and take a picnic.

    The La Boqueria Food Market, off Las Ramblas (a tourist attraction in it’s own right):

    Take a half day trip to Montserrat – you can do this easily by train or with a coach tour:

    Nb: Definately catch the Furnicular/Cog Train up to the Monastery:

    Listen to the oldest established boy choir in Europe and explore the Monserrat Basilica:

     

    Explore Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter – discover all some of the nooks and crannies:

    Check out the Barcelona Cathedral:

    … say ‘Hey’ to the 13 Geese there

    See some Picasso artworks in the Museum and on the buildings:

     

     Above all, enjoy the amazing weather, the tasty Tapas, Slurp Sangria and relax. We also managed one of our 101 in 1001 – no phones, no internet for 4 days.

    Really good Tip: Pickpockets are rife on the Metro; don’t have you valuables easy to snatch, try and keep to the middle of the tube trains (Pickpockets tend to haunt the ends as they can get away quick) and above keep a really good eye out. If someone stands really close to you or asks something out of the ordinary (especially in English) be really aware that they may be pick pockets.

    We really enjoyed Barcelona, it’s a great city break.


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    Barcelona, Spain and the glory of Gaudi

    We started with a walking tour of Gaudi’s most famous works and our tour guide asked us: Genius or Madman? (Warning, you may want to make a cup of tea and get a biscuit, this is quite a photo heavy post, sorry!)

    Antoni Gaudi (1852-1926) was a Spanish Catalan architect and figurehead of Catalan Modernism. His architecture reflected his passions of architecture, nature and religion. (Wikipedia)

    He created/modified some of the most amazing buildings, using nature as a basis for everything he designed. The Sagrada Familia was his masterpiece, and is still not finished nearly 100 years after his death, even though he spent the last 12 years of his life exclusively working on it.

    Casa Batlló (1904–1906): My only regret of the holiday – running out of time to see the internal rooms of this house.

    Casa Milà, better known as La Pedrera (1906–1910):

    Gaudi’s one and only public commission: two lamp posts in the Plaça Reial

    La Sagrada Família: we took 5 hours to wander around. It’s really funny, we meant to spend a couple of hours max (including the tower tour) but it just sucked us in. Hint: book your entry tickets online in advance – the entry queues are phenomenal otherwise, and book your tower tour when enter the site.

    The Passion Facade:

     

    The Nativity Facade

     

    Up the on the bridge between the Nativity Facade towers:

    Park Güell: (great views over Barcelona, and fantastic to take a picnic to)

    Sorry that was so Photo heavy – the buildings were just out of this world. I think he was both a genius and a madman – you have to be both to be great I think.

    We also took a walking tour whilst there with Running Bean Tours, who show you around the city (but don’t include internal tours) who work on a no fee basis – you tip the guide how much you think they earned. They have a Gaudi tour, and an Old Town tour. It was great.
     

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    Barcelona, Spain – Sangria, sunshine and the Sagrada Familia

    Founded by Hercules, (or Hamilcar Barca depending on who you ask) is a city with a rich cultural footprint and by and large, great weather. We have just returned from a 4-day city break there, enjoying exploring it’s twists and turns.

    Favourite memories include;

    Sun, Siestas, Gaudi, Sagrada Familia, Spanglish, Views, The Mediterranian, Unplanned Picnics, Chess!?, Sangria, Monasteries above the clouds, Paella, Gothic Architecture, Flan and more sunshine.

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